free run 2 When did grocery stores start

When did grocery stores start using plastic bags

America’s largest grocery companies Safeway and Kroger started using them in 1982

Plastic shopping bags, carrier bags or plastic grocery bags are a common type of shopping bag in several countries. Most often these bags are intended for one single use to carry items from a store to a home: reuse for storage or trash (bin bags) is common.

The lightweight shopping bag as we know it today is the invention of Swedish engineer Sten Gustaf Thulin[1]. He developed his idea for forming a simple one piece bag by folding, welding and die cutting a flat tube of plastic in the early 1960s for packaging company Celloplast of Norrkping, Sweden. His idea produced a simple, strong bag with a high load carrying capacity and was patented worldwide by Celloplast in 1965.

Celloplast was a well established producer of cellulose film and a pioneer in plastics processing. The company’s patent position gave it a virtual monopoly on plastic shopping bag production and the company set up manufacturing plants across Europe and in the US. However, other free run 2 companies saw the attraction of the bag, too, and US petrochemicals group Mobil overturned the Celloplast US patent in 1977. The Dixie Bag Company of College Park, Georgia, owned and operated by Jack W. McBride (“The Bagman”) was one of the first companies to exploit this new opportunity to bring convenient products to all major shopping stores. McBride’s Dixie Bag Company, as well as Houston Poly Bag and Capitol Poly were instrumental in the manufacturing, marketing and perfecting of this bag by the early 1980s. Kroger, a Cincinnati based grocery chain, agreed to try this innovation.[2] So, the real change in grocery bags did not start until 1982, when the two of America’s largest grocery companies Safeway and Kroger started replacing paper bag free run 2 s with more affordable plastic bags.[2]

Without its plastic bag monopoly, Celloplast’s business went into decline, and the company was split up during the 1990 free run 2 s. The Norrkping site remains a plastics production site, however, and is now the headquarters of Miljsck, Sweden’s largest producer of waste sacks manufactured from recycled polyethylene.

From the mid 1980s on, the use of plastic bags became common for carrying daily groceries from the store to our vehicles and finally to our homes.

The lightweight shopping bag as we know it today is the invention of Swedish free run 2 engineer Sten Gustaf Thulin[1]. He developed his idea for forming a simple one piece bag by folding, welding and die cutting a flat tube of plastic in the early 1960s for packaging company Celloplast of Norrkping, Sweden. His idea produced a simple, strong bag with a high load carrying capacity and was patented worldwide by Celloplast in 1965.

Celloplast was a well established producer of cellulose film and a pioneer in plastics processing. The company’s patent position gave it a virtual monopoly on plastic shopping bag production and the company set up manufacturing plants across Europe and in the US. However, other companies saw the attraction of the bag, too, and US petrochemicals group Mobil overturned the Celloplast US patent in 1977. The Dixie Bag Company of College Park, Georgia, owned and operated by Jack W. McBride (“The Bagman”) was one of the first companies to exploit this new opportunity to bring convenient products to all major shopping stores. McBride’s Dixie Bag Company, as well as Houston Poly Bag and Capitol Poly were instrumental in the manufacturing, marketing and perfecting of this bag by the early 1980s. Kroger, a Cincinnati based grocery chain, agreed to try this innovation.[2] So, the real change in grocery bags did not start until 1982, when the two of America’s largest grocery companies Safeway and Kroger started replacing paper bags with more affordable plastic bags.[2]

Without its plastic bag monopoly, Celloplast’s business went into decline, and the company was split up during the 1990s. The Norrkping site remains a plastics production site, however, and is now the headquarters of Miljsck, Sweden’s largest producer of waste sacks manufactured from recycled polyethylene.

From the mid 1980s on, the use of plastic bags became common for carrying daily groceries from the store to our vehicles and finally to our homes. As plastic bags increasingly replaced paper bags, and as other plastic materials and products replaced glass, metal, stone, timber and other materials, a packaging materials war erupted with plastic shopping bags at the centre of highly publicised battles.